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Pizza is one of those foods you will find pretty much anywhere in the world in one form or another. I would like to compile a listing of the best pizza places, so if you have a really good local pizza restaurant you are fond of, please share! Give us a brief line as to why they are so good! I’m wanting the one-off places and the small local and regional chains of your area, not the corporate conglomerate suspects. For the Domino’s/Pizza Hut debate, go here and cast your vote. If homemade pizza is your go-to, feel free to share your recipes and I'll list them in a separate section here.

I’ll start out with some that have been consistently good for me over the years. I had more but checked and found a couple I loved had indeed closed (Sandy's Pizza in Toledo Washington R.I.P)

Fire in the Belly in Lismore, New South Wales, Australa. The wood-fired pizza oven is a big red tile dragon and the pizza is awesome. Been a few years since I was in Lismore,but it seems to have the staying power.

The Burrow in Brisbane's West-End. Also with good beer and nice atmosphere! I was a regular here until I moved out of the city. They used to have this pizza called the Diana Ross that was an awesome Supreme.

Uno's Pizzeria - A Chicago Deep-Dish chain. Hoping one comes to Melbourne Australia someday.

Colle Rosso Italiano Ristorante makes a lovely thin crust pizza it a perfect Italian style. Their pizza chef came from another restaurant that used to have really good pizza....

Vulcan Pizza right near our house is one of those storefront deliver places that don’t look like much. But they put it all into their pizas, and they deliver them really hot right out of the oven!

Northlake Tavern in Seattle. An awesome Italian pizzahouse that got its start as a lowly beer and wine tavern. The crust is sublime and the homemade sauce is a bit different than most typical canned pizza sauce used in so many places.

Smoking Monkey south of Seattle, this place is a quirky little space-restaurant that serves wonderful wood-fired oven pizzas along with their science-fiction themed artwork. I need to mention the deep-fried cauliflower is wonderful as well as their small but good beer tap list.

Nostrana – in Portland Oregon. This is really good traditional Napoléon pizza! Yum!

BC Pizza (shared by Zephyr) Kalamazoo Michigan. Looks like a worthy stop!

Mod Pizza (shared by Zephyr)
Zelphyr wrote:
The pizza I eat most these days is Mod Pizza. It's... more like pizza toppings on a giant cracker, thin as the crust is, but it's relatively inexpensive, easy to get, tasty enough, and it's a flat price regardless of toppings. The company also likes to to try to get involved with charity work and such. I know they're around Portland, Oregon, but I'm not sure if they spread far beyond that.
Mod... I remember my brother mention them one time when I was visiting him. They started in Seattle a year after I left, and according to the website, have been quite successful even having locations in England!

Red Devil (shared by MercyInReach) in Holly Michigan. According to their website they have a location in Fenton as well. Here is Mercyinreach's review:
MercyInReach wrote:
The Red Devil the crust amazing, dense, soft, but crispy, the cheese lots of it and absolutely delicious bubbly and their pizzas are HUGE for a good price. I usually only got cheese when I got pizza from there but their other toppings are good as well.

Papa Luigi (shared by StaticNightmares) in the UK.
StaticNightmares wrote:
Papa Luigi's 100%.

They're extremely cheap, but their portions are enough for 1 pizza to serve at least 9 or 10 people. Not to mention their crust is always cooked to perfection, as well as the rest of the pizza. 1000/10 would recommend.

Mellow Mushroom (shared by Lucretire) - A regional southeastern U.S. chain with a amattering of locations west of the Mississippi and up into the rust belt and reaching toward New York. Good Pizza and Burgers and funky individual artistic decor at its different locations.

Looking forward to some good pizza from around the world!

As an aside, homemade pizza can be some of the best! Feel free to share your fav recipes!

Sanne's Recipe
350g all-purpose flour
200-220 ml lukewarm water
1.5 teaspoon instant yeast
1.5 teaspoon sugar
1.5 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon oil (olive or sunflower)
Optional: additional seasoning, e.g. 1 tsp garlic powder, 1-2 tsp of italian herbs mix

Don't 'start' the yeast, just mix all dry ingredients, then add oil and water. Use dough hooks with a hand mixer and knead the dough for 2-3 minutes to develop gluten. If you're doing it by hand, knead at least 5-10 minutes. The dough should come off the edges of the bowl cleanly, if it sticks add about 1 tablespoon of flour and knead until it's tacky but not sticky.

Coat the bowl with a little bit of oil and put the dough back in. Cover with a folded kitchen towel and place in the oven for 30 minutes, with the heat turned off and the pilot light turned on. The pilot light will be warm enough to help the dough rise without using the heat.

Take the dough out of the bowl and cut in two even pieces for two pizzas (or use the whole thing for a mega pizza!). Place leftover dough in the fridge.

You need to roll out the dough, I usually place a baking paper sheet (NOT WAX PAPER, IT MELTS AND CATCHES FIRE!!) on the counter, flour it lightly, then roll out the dough on the sheet with a rolling pin, but you can roll it out on the counter and then transfer it over to a sheet lined tray. Remember it rises slightly so make it slightly thinner than you want the final pizza to be. Transfer the sheet onto a flat oven tray. I wet the edges and fold them over to create a raised crust, but it's optional. Prick all over the pizza dough with a fork, then top with your sauce and toppings of choice.

Bake on the lowest rack in the oven with upper and lower heat elements at 230-250C until the crust is golden brown. 230 is safer if you want to avoid a charred bottom on the crust. The crust will be crispy on the bottom without the toppings being burned. :D

For sauce:
It's as easy as getting a tomato paste and adding water, or pasteurized tomato sauce, whichever you prefer. Add salt, pepper, garlic (powder), italian herbs, and whatever else you fancy in your sauce. Spread a thin layer on the crust, top with grated cheese, then top with whatever you want. Boom done.
Sanne Moderator

I only buy frozen pizzas or make my own anymore these days so I have zero recommendations, but... I do have an awesome pizza dough recipe that makes for amazing pizzas! Is that alright to share or would it be too off-topic? :)
I enjoy Domino's pan pizza, but my fond pizza memories revolve around I place I can't access anymore: BC Pizza. Originally it was for "Boyne City," but it it became "Best Choice" and the company started growing and opening more locations. Their pizza was even a standard lunch option at one of the schools I attended.

Last I checked, 99% of locations were still only in Michigan (mostly the northern LP, I think), with one that opened in Georgia and I think one down in Florida. It's been nearly 20 years since I had it... so I don't know if it's changed.

The pizza I eat most these days is Mod Pizza. It's... more like pizza toppings on a giant cracker, thin as the crust is, but it's relatively inexpensive, easy to get, tasty enough, and it's a flat price regardless of toppings. The company also likes to to try to get involved with charity work and such. I know they're around Portland, Oregon, but I'm not sure if they spread far beyond that.
Rogue-Scribe Topic Starter

Sanne wrote:
I only buy frozen pizzas or make my own anymore these days so I have zero recommendations, but... I do have an awesome pizza dough recipe that makes for amazing pizzas! Is that alright to share or would it be too off-topic? :)

Yeah Share! It dovetails with really good pizza!

And Mod Pizza and BC Pizza has been noted! :)
Sanne Moderator

My Pizza dough recipe

350g all-purpose flour
200-220 ml lukewarm water
1.5 teaspoon instant yeast
1.5 teaspoon sugar
1.5 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon oil (olive or sunflower)
Optional: additional seasoning, e.g. 1 tsp garlic powder, 1-2 tsp of italian herbs mix

Don't 'start' the yeast, just mix all dry ingredients, then add oil and water. Use dough hooks with a hand mixer and knead the dough for 2-3 minutes to develop gluten. If you're doing it by hand, knead at least 5-10 minutes. The dough should come off the edges of the bowl cleanly, if it sticks add about 1 tablespoon of flour and knead until it's tacky but not sticky.

Coat the bowl with a little bit of oil and put the dough back in. Cover with a folded kitchen towel and place in the oven for 30 minutes, with the heat turned off and the pilot light turned on. The pilot light will be warm enough to help the dough rise without using the heat.

Take the dough out of the bowl and cut in two even pieces for two pizzas (or use the whole thing for a mega pizza!). Place leftover dough in the fridge.

You need to roll out the dough, I usually place a baking paper sheet (NOT WAX PAPER, IT MELTS AND CATCHES FIRE!!) on the counter, flour it lightly, then roll out the dough on the sheet with a rolling pin, but you can roll it out on the counter and then transfer it over to a sheet lined tray. Remember it rises slightly so make it slightly thinner than you want the final pizza to be. Transfer the sheet onto a flat oven tray. I wet the edges and fold them over to create a raised crust, but it's optional. Prick all over the pizza dough with a fork, then top with your sauce and toppings of choice.

Bake on the lowest rack in the oven with upper and lower heat elements at 230-250C until the crust is golden brown. 230 is safer if you want to avoid a charred bottom on the crust. The crust will be crispy on the bottom without the toppings being burned. :D

For sauce:
It's as easy as getting a tomato paste and adding water, or pasteurized tomato sauce, whichever you prefer. Add salt, pepper, garlic (powder), italian herbs, and whatever else you fancy in your sauce. Spread a thin layer on the crust, top with grated cheese, then top with whatever you want. Boom done.


My roommate has been craving pizzas a lot lately so I've baked a ton of these. The ingredients are cheap and the pizzas are really good and filling.
The Red Devil in Holly Michigan. I haven't been there in years even though I live like an hour and a half away simply because I just don't have the money to drive that long to get pizza -- but the crust amazing, dense, soft, but crispy, the cheese lots of it and absolutely delicious bubbly and their pizzas are HUGE for a good price. I usually only got cheese when I got pizza from there but their other toppings are good as well.

I'll need to make a trip of going there someday to get pizza and visit the other lil shops, it's really a very quaint town but you have to make at least 70k a year to live there.
Hmm... Before I went keto, I loved The Mellow Mushroom. The chain as a whole is small and usually owned/operated by locals in the area, from what I've heard.

They have some good pizza, and their burgers aren't bad, either! The funky atmosphere's good for creative types, too; in fact, every shop I've seen so far has its own unique look and design.
Rogue-Scribe Topic Starter

Lucretire wrote:
Hmm... Before I went keto, I loved The Mellow Mushroom. The chain as a whole is small and usually owned/operated by locals in the area, from what I've heard.

They have some good pizza, and their burgers aren't bad, either! The funky atmosphere's good for creative types, too; in fact, every shop I've seen so far has its own unique look and design.

Looks good! Their website shows locations all over the southeast USA with some west of the Mississippi and up into the rust belt and reaching toward New York.

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